I do apologize. Posting negative stuff is absolutely not in my agenda, but this time around I am making an exception. I got scammed and that’s why I want to warn everyone out there, so that You don’t have to make the same mistake than I did. Like I promised in the very first blog post back in 2019, this blog will be a totally transparent documentation of my journey. With all the success but also including all the failures. This episode obviously falls into the latter. To summarize my recent experience: Coin Flip Capital is a scam.

Here’s the short summary of what happened. I was first approached by a man (he called himself Jeremy Mason) via Instagram and he claimed to be part of Grant Cardone’s 10x sales team, and that actually caught my attention. But why would a sales team leader for such a renowned and accomplished business guru as GC approach randomly someone like me, a total stranger, via IG? That was the first flag. Nevertheless, he seemed to be a funny and straight forward kind of a guy and I continued my conversation with him. He introduced this London based broker, Coin Flip Capital, and their investment plans looked seriously interesting. I mean, they were amazing.

“50.00% commission every 10 Days”

It has been said that compounded interest is the eight wonder of the world. And this particular enterprise sure utilized this aspect! They promise 50% profit to an investment of more than 10k in 10 days! You must agree that this is phenomenal. Even if you started with their minimum requirement of $200, you could make around 1,3 million dollars in about 6 months. And boy, did I have my excel simulations tweaked up and my finger on a speed dial for the local Dodge dealer ready to order my Challenger. I sent my daughter, who just happens to live in London, immediately to Canary Wharf and double check if this mysteriously generous company actually exists in that address. Well, it doesn’t. At the same time my friend had a chat with their “customer service”. They claimed that they are listed in London Stock Exchange. Turned out to be a lie.

You may wonder why I started trading with them, even though the warning bells were going off like crazy. That is a very good question. I started slow. First just a couple of hundreds in as bitcoins and an immediate test and withdraw. Everything worked exactly as they promised. I was able to return some of my initial stakes back to my cryptocurrency exchange. Then I raised my stakes and entered the mid-level. Next investment was a tad more than 1000 bucks and it was working as a charm. At this point I really wanted to help my friends and get them involved as well. Surprise, surprise, Coin Flip Capital also has a referral program, so it was easy to share my affiliate link. After all, this is a very common way for many companies nowadays to leverage their sales, so it sounded legit to me.

More warning signs

I continued my close communication with “Jeremy”. At some point he said that his IG account is temporarily on hold, because he was waiting for that blue tic verification to be added on his account. That one I never believed. Obviously I did my research on him and the only Jeremy I was able to locate in GC’s empire was Jeremy Moorehead. According to Google image search, Mr. Moorehead looked exactly like my Jeremy and Mr. Moorehead just happened to live on Mason Street 🙂 Anyway, we switched to WhatsApp. I just played along, even though I was on my toes all the time. My only strategy was to generate enough profits fast, so that I could get all of my initial capital back. After that it would be just a game. I calculated that my payday would have been in about 6 weeks in the future. You can imagine how fast the capital was growing with “only” 28% profit in 7 days cycles. What I underestimated was their speed to change the game.

Somewhere along the lines, I got curious. As a person who always wants to learn new stuff, I wanted to find out how does the enterprise like Grant Cardone selects its partners. I asked “Jeremy” that how did they decide to pursue business interests with Coin Flip. It took me three attempts to make him even understand what I asked. He didn’t convince me one bit as a pro sales team leader. This guy didn’t have a clue how successful enterprises operate and how they have processes in place. My mind was screaming: Coin Flip Capital is a scam!

Lock down

Next thing I noticed was that they had put my account on pause. And not just mine, but a few friends of mine experienced the same fate. Three of them had around 300 bucks in the game. Coin Flip Capital asked them to “upgrade” their accounts by additional 600 bucks, so that investments would be back in full swing. The reasoning was that there was no markets or demand with that amount. Which I can believe. That extra upgrade would have put them to around 900-1000 dollar league. What really surprised me was that they used exactly the same verbiage with me. I had around $2700 (thank god not all my own money, but accumulated profits) in my pool and they asked me additional 2500 bucks. Another friend of mine with $1000 bag was asked to upgrade with $1500. None of this made any sense.

So there we were – our accounts locked, not being able to withdraw from our wallets and conversation was going back and forth with them. They promised that all investments would recommence as soon as they received the additional funds. And I almost took that bite! I mean, it was very tempting. “Jeremy” said that he’s gonna upgrade his account with $3000 (he also claimed to have 30k bag invested but he didn’t have to upgrade that one). So there was only one thought in my mind at this point: Coin Flip Capital is a scam. For some funny reason it seemed to take days for “Jeremy” to transfer his Etheriums to Coin Flip Capital and that raised my eyebrows even further.

Communication

I even asked their “customer service” about this situation and why they still actively promote on their home page, that the minimum investment is $200. Their explanation was just another set of jargon, which didn’t make any logical sense. They demanded an upgrade to an account, so that the value raise from $300 to $900. This was to secure an investment being attractive enough in the markets. When at the same time they accept new investments with $200. Total rubbish!

The communication level with Coin Flip Capital had also been subpar. I understand that the younger generation does not respect punctuation, capital letters or correct spelling. Or people come from all over the world and English is maybe not their first language, but still. I have always tried to make sure that I spell correctly (doesn’t mean that I’m perfect). Even with my SMS and other chats, I always try to respect the proper spelling and grammar, so you can imagine my frustration when it’s hard to even understand what the other party is trying to communicate.

Oh furthermore, about their technical platform. I opened a ticket in my account at one point, and that ticket showed in my friend’s back office! I mean c’mon, how lousy can the coding and the security be and we’re talking about an investment broker here. That one was actually hilarious.

Final nail in the coffin

So Coin Flip was totally illogical in their communication and they had been caught red handed in lying to us. “Jeremy” didn’t have a clue about the certain issues I raised. The company was not located where they claimed to be. There are no disclaimers, privacy policies nor references to GDPR and that kind of stuff on their web site. What else do I need to say?

But I needed that final confirmation that Coin Flip Capital is a scam. And then I did what I should have done in the very beginning. I called Grant Cardone’s HQ in Miami. Immediately I got a hold of this one very helpful lady and she was happy to answer all my questions. No, GC deals only with real estate assets. No, there is no guy working for them called “Jeremy Mason”. However, Jeremy Moorehead (remember the guy who looks like the spitting image of “Jeremy Mason”) noticed that someone had opened a profile and used his pictures etc. Mr. Moorehead had then asked Instagram to cancel this fake profile, which they did. I thanked the nice lady for cooperation and smiled. I had been scammed. But I didn’t care. This was a game and I had set my very tight rules and I absolutely had to stay within the sidelines. I didn’t risk more than I afforded to lose.

Then I bluntly wrote them an email, asking them to return my and my friends’ initial investments back in bitcoins. I gave them two days to comply, before I start a campaign against them (which you are witnessing right now). The only outcome was that they denied our access to our accounts completely. So they basically shut us off without any warning or explanation. And took our money. Which obviously tells that these guys are criminals.

Conclusion

You may ask yourself: Why am I sharing this very personal and maybe even an embarrassing failure story? First and foremost, I don’t want anyone else to fall into this honey pot. There is an old saying “If something looks too good to be true, then it most likely is.” This particular episodes proves that old wisdom to withhold the truth once again.

Second, I don’t believe that the opposite of success is failure. It is mediocrity. And there is plenty of that in this world. Too many people are afraid of trying anything new in their lives and that’s why they never achieve anything great. So I lost a few hundred bucks, but that’s only money. And besides, I had a lots of fun doing this and tipping my toes into crypto scams. Next time I will be much better prepared and hopefully will not make the same mistake. Just remember – Coin Flip Capital is a scam.

Love and peace guys!